What to Look For in a Boarding Facility

Posted by: LaVonne Wilson | August 29, 2018 | Posted in Dog Boarding, Dog Daycare, Uncategorized

If you’re going away on vacation or business, you won’t be able to relax if you’re constantly worrying about your dog and the facility he’s staying at. To ease your mind, here are some essential items you should be looking for when picking out a quality dog boarding facility for your pooch:

  • Staff Training: A quality pet care facility should have at least one member of staff on duty that has some sort of officially recognized pet care qualifications, such as being CPR certified. No matter what their position is at the facility, all members of the staff should be trained in doggy first aid.
  • Vaccinations: All pet care facilities missions should be to provide your dog with a fully interactive, healthy, and safe experience. Therefore, make sure the facility you choose requires that all dogs staying with them are up to date with all their vaccinations, including Bordetella. You should be required to show proof of vaccinations upon arrival to the facility to ensure that everything’s in order before your dog’s stay.
  • Recommendations: Research different facilities online and read reviews. Ask friends and family about facilities they have used in the past, or even ask your veterinarian for recommendations. Once you narrow down your list, look online on various social media platforms to see if other guests would recommend the facility you’re considering.
  • Cleanliness: Once you’ve narrowed down your options, visit the facility before sending your dog there to check that it’s up to code. Ensure that it’s well-kept, clean, and safe for your dog.

The team here at Central Bark is dedicated to providing superior service to their customers and their furry friends. Give us a call today and experience peace of mind from a reliable, pet care company.

Advantages of Using a Professional Dog Boarding Facility

Posted by: LaVonne Wilson | July 13, 2018 | Posted in Dog Boarding

If you’re planning a summer vacation or have a scheduled work trip, you’ll need to make accommodations for your furry family members while you’re gone. Here at Central Bark, we provide an environment where your dog can play and socialize with other friendly dogs in a supervised and caring setting. All of our staff members are extensively trained in dog behavior, pet first aid, and are CPR certified. In case of emergency, they will know how to administer medicine and give your pet approved treatments while you’re out of town. You’ll be able to travel knowing your dog is in good hands. Here are some additional advantages of using a dog boarding facility:



• Provides regular exercise to maintain a healthy weight
• Relieves boredom, separation anxiety, and destructive behaviors at home
• Improves socialization with dogs and people
• Enhances quality of life

Dog boarding facilities offer your pet a familiar place for them to relax other than your home. Introducing your pets to new experiences is good for their health, mental sharpness, and will build their socialization skills. As a pet owner, you’ll appreciate the peace of mind you’ll get when you bring your dog to a safe and caring place.
The team here at Central Bark is committed to providing a premium level of service to their customers and their animal companions. Give us a call today and experience peace of mind from a reliable, pet care company.

How to Keep Your Dog Cool This Summer

Posted by: LaVonne Wilson | June 18, 2018 | Posted in Dog Health

Summer is finally here and we’re excited to be doing our favorite activities outdoors. Summer is the best time of year to be out and about enjoying all that the season has to offer. However, the heat can be dangerous for our fur-covered loved ones if we aren’t being careful. We want to help you make this summer safe and fun for all of your four-legged family members. Here are a few tips to help you beat the heat this summer:

 
• Brush it out: If your dog sheds, this is the time that most dogs will begin to lose their undercoat. The undercoat is the wooly fur that keeps dogs warm during the winter. In order to keep your dog cool, you need to brush them so that their coat doesn’t become tangled or matted. If you don’t usually groom your dog yourself, be sure to schedule a dog grooming appointment!

• Never leave your dog in a car unattended: Your dog should never be left in a car during the summer or during high temperatures for any length of time; even if you’re running into the store for 5 minutes. Rolling down the windows are not enough to protect your dogs from the humidity and heat. They can easily overheat, and possibly have a heat stroke.
• Make frozen treats: Frozen treats are a fun and easy way to keep your dog cool over the summer. You can use common food items such as peanut butter or dog food.
• Plan ahead: Be sure to check the weather prior to spending the day outside with your dog. You don’t want to exert your dog during outside activities. If temperatures are out of control, it’s best to leave them at home. If you decide to take them with you, watch for heavy panting, weak legs, and slower movements. Remember, if your dog is having fun they’ll try to power through the heat, but you’ll know best! Be sure to bring water with you as well – if possible frozen water bottles.

The most important thing to do is enjoy the summer! If you have any questions at all, feel free to give us a call or come in and speak to one of our trained professionals!

Are Your Yard and Garden Toxic to Your Dog?

Posted by: Pack Leader | April 20, 2016 | Posted in Dog Health

 

 

The sun is finally shining, bees are buzzing and flowers are blooming. Our incredibly wet Seattle winter has turned into spring and here at Central Bark we could not be more excited for the warmer weather. Spring also prompts us to spend more time in our yard or the outdoors but this also exposes some unexpected health risks to our dogs if they ingest plants. With April being National Pet First Aid Awareness Month as well as Lawn and Garden Month, here’s a list of common toxic plants to keep an eye out for in your yard and gardens.

Plants Toxic to DogsPlants Toxic to Dogs

Flowers are beautiful to look at but they can be toxic if ingested by our dogs, here’s a list of toxic plants that might be in your yard or garden:

Buttercup
Calla Lily
Chrysanthemum
Daffodil
Daisy
English Ivy
Gardenia
Geranium
Heavenly Bamboo
Hyacinth
Hydrangea
Lavender
Lily of the Valley
Peony
Pothos
Rhododendron (Azalea)
Sweet Pea
Tulip

Do you have a fruit trees or vegetable/herb garden? Below are some of the toxic (if ingested) plants to look out for:

Apricots*/Plums*/Peach*/Cherry* (stem, leaves and seeds)
Apples*/Cranberries (stem, leaves and seeds)
Fig
Garlic
Mint
Onion
Oregano
Parsley
Rhubarb
Sweet Potato Vine
Tomato Plant

*These fruits do contain pits/seeds; in addition to being toxic they can cause intestinal obstructions if ingested depending on size of pit and dog.

This isn’t a complete list of all the toxic plants to dogs, if you want more check out ASPCA’s extensive list which includes pictures, the toxic component and the scientific name of all the plants.

Why Daycare Rocks for Puppies!

Posted by: Pack Leader | March 10, 2016 | Posted in Dog Daycare

 Puppy in Daycare Picture

Daycare isn’t for every dog but a lot of dogs benefit from the extra playtime and mental stimulation that they receive at daycare. Puppies especially benefit from daycare and here are the top 7 reason daycare rocks for puppies!

 

1.Learn good play behavior

Just like any kid, puppies need to learn proper social etiquette. Having the exposure to different play styles and ages of dogs while at daycare will help you puppy learn appropriate play

2.Burn that puppy energy

No one will argue that puppies are bundles of energy! They quickly recharge after a nap and are ready to go again. The awesome benefit of daycare is that they can burn some of the puppy energy throughout the day rather than having it pent up for when you get home from work.

Puppy in Daycare Picture

3.Reduced potty accidents in the house

It’s no surprise puppies have accidents in the house. A 8-hour work day is a long time for a puppy to hold its bladder, especially if they are still figuring out potty training. At daycare, they are able to relieve themselves when needed so no need to worry about your four-legged pup soiling on your carpet.

4.Emergency dog care

Life is never predictable, emergencies come up: work runs late, last minute trips, etc. If your puppy is already evaluated and a regular at daycare, it makes those emergencies less stressful and a tad bit easier to handle. Knowing your puppy is happy, comfortable and safe while you’re away is the greatest piece of mind.

5.Enforcement of training outside the home

One of the major benefits of daycare is reinforcement of training done at home while the dogs are at daycare. Ask the staff at your daycare facility to reinforce the behaviors you are working with at home.

Puppy in Daycare Picture

6.Makes lots of dog friends

This plays into the dog socialization part but a lot of dogs find their doggy best friend while at daycare or make friends with everyone and play all day long!

7.Freedom!

If you haven’t already figured it out but puppies take up a lot of time and work. It’s sometimes nice to be able to drop off your four-legged kid at daycare for a couple hours so you can run errands, clean the house and then come back to pick up a tired puppy ready for a long nap.

We want to hear from you! Have you tried daycare with your puppy? What was your experience?

 

Open Wide, Here’s Some Dog Dental Care Tips & Tricks!

Posted by: Pack Leader | February 6, 2016 | Posted in Dog Health

CB dog smilingFebruary is Pet Oral Health Month! Clean teeth and gums are an important part of keeping your dog happy and healthy but it’s one area that a lot of pet parents let fall to the side. As daunting of a task as brushing your dog’s teeth may seem, it’s doesn’t have to be! Below are some tips and tricks to help make developing an oral care routine an easy, fun task for you and your dog!

Let’s first start with the supplies:

 

Don’t have a dog toothbrush? Dog toothbrushes designed for dogs are great but in a pinch you can also use a soft bristled children’s toothbrush, a finger toothbrush or a clean sock wrapped around your finger.

Worried about the chemicals/ingredients of dog toothpaste you find the pet stores? There are multiple DIY dog toothpaste recipes available online all of which contain ingredients that are probably already in your kitchen.

Thinking about using human toothpaste to brush your dog’s teeth? Don’t do it! Never use human toothpaste when brushing your dog’s teeth- it contains ingredients that are harmful to your dog when ingested.

On to the actual teeth brushing:

 

We’re new to teeth brushing, where do I start? Start off with letting your dog lick the toothpaste off your finger for a couple teeth brushing sessions. Graduate to rubbing their teeth/gums with your finger for a couple sessions. After that let them lick the toothpaste off the toothbrush for a couple sessions. Then you can try and brush a couple teeth working your way up each session to brushing more teeth. If your dog protests at a certain step then review the previous step. We want to make sure that it’s a positive experience so always make sure to end any session with positive reinforcement i.e. treat, toy or attention.

My dog won’t let me brush all his/her teeth! Don’t get discouraged, if your dog is already comfortable with letting you brush only a couple of teeth at a time, do short sessions making sure to end each one with positive reinforcement i.e. toy, treat or attention and work your way up. There’s no rush and no need to force teeth brushing on your dog; take your time and it’ll pay off in the end!

How often should I brush my dog’s teeth? Vets suggest daily brushing of dog’s teeth but brushing 3-4 times a week will help prevent the buildup of plaque.

Are there certain areas to focus on when brushing the teeth? Yes! Make sure to get the canine’s and the upper back molars where food tends to get caught.

Lastly, the entire oral care routine:

 

Do I have to do more to maintain good oral health for my dog? Yes, in conjunction to regular teeth brushing you also want to get a veterinarian to checkout your dog’s teeth. Some dogs even with regular teeth brushing will need a professional teeth cleaning to remove built up plaque. There are also more you can do at home to aid in good oral health, see question below.CB dog holding toothbrush

What else can I do at home to maintain good oral health for my dog? In addition to regular teeth brushing, you can feed supplements (check out your local pet store for options) or provide treats/chews that help reduce plaque buildup. When purchasing chews and toys make sure to take into account the size of your dog and how active of chewer they are. Not sure which one to get your dog? Ask your local pet store and they’ll be able to give you the best toys for your dog.

Lastly and most important, make sure whatever your oral care routine includes, to make it a positive experience for your dog! Incorporate toys, treats and playtime as rewards and it’ll make developing as well as maintaining an oral care routine a breeze!

Still have questions about dog oral health? Leave your comments below!

Meet Central Bark’s Grooming Team!

Posted by: Pack Leader | November 21, 2015 | Posted in Dog Grooming

Central Bark now has two groomers on staff to meet your grooming needs!

Andrea Groom

Andrea has been sprucing dogs and cats up with her gentle and caring touch for 13 years. Her passion for all dogs- big, small, fuzzy and hairy has been with her since childhood but rescue dogs hold a special place in her heart. You’ll regularly see Andrea around Central Bark with her sidekick, Oopsy Chihuahua Mix who is one of her 3 rescue furkids. Andrea is available Tuesday-Saturday for full grooms & bath n’ blowout appointments every week!

Amanda Grooming

Amanda has been making over dogs for 7 years and has returned to Central Bark after a year long maternity leave. She has a passion for grooming all different breeds and loves getting to know each of the dogs’ personalities. Her expertise includes standard breed cuts as well as more creative ones including mohawks, adding feathers or even bling for the dog to wear. Amanda is available on Sundays for full grooms & bath n’ blowout appointments every week!

 

Call us (206)325-3525 or email info@central-bark.com to make an appointment with Andrea or Amanda.

Senior Dogs Will Steal Your Heart & This Is Why…

Posted by: Pack Leader | November 4, 2015 | Posted in Dog Behavior

_MG_5731November is National Senior Pet Month! If you’re looking to add another family member, adding a senior dog is a great option. Dogs graduate into the “senior” age group after 7 years old so don’t think that just because they are senior that they don’t have any life left in them. Below are some reasons as to why senior dogs rock!

 

 

1.) Senior dogs are not like onions… meaning you’re unlikely to get surprises in their behavior. As dogs socially mature they undergo behavior changes which as a new dog owner, these can be exciting or unwelcomed changes. However, a senior dog has already gracefully matured into themselves so no worries about sudden personality changes.

 

 

2.) Despite the popular saying, you can indeed teach an old dog new tricks! Senior dogs generally have some basic obedience under their belt so there’s less work you have to do in order to get a well behaved dog.

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3.) Netflix & Chill? Senior dogs are down for some good napping and lounging. Unlike their younger counterparts they need less exercise and are very happy spending quality time with you around the house. (Less exercise does not mean no exercise though! Moderate exercise will keep them happy & healthy).

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4.) Save the shoes & carpet. Another benefit of senior dogs is they are already potty-trained and have gone through their chewing phase so your carpet and shoes are spared from the regular puppy potty accidents and puppy teething phase.5.) Save money on the puppysitter. Senior dogs don’t need 24/7 supervising like puppies do. When you are adopting a senior dog you’re getting a mature dog that can be left alone for a whole day at work or if you want to go out for a couple hours on the weekend.

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Lastly, you will be saving a life. Senior dogs are not pet rejects and deserve a loving home just as much as the younger dogs in shelters but many times they are overlooked for the stereotype of being an “old dog”. Senior dogs don’t mean they are can’t still romp around and be a fantastic pet. Next time you’re looking to add a new family member consider getting a senior pet, they just might steal your heart.

BOO!! Some Howling Good Halloween Safety Tips

Posted by: Pack Leader | October 25, 2015 | Posted in Dog Behavior, Dog Events, Dog Health

CB PumpkinHappy Howl-O-Ween! This spooky time of year brings candy, costumes and a haunting good time but not always for our dogs. Below are some quick tips to ensure you and your dog have an enjoyable Halloween.

Costumes:

The best part of Halloween is dressing up in whatever costume you choose! We may enjoy dressing up but our four-legged friends may not. If you are dressing your dog up and they are not used to wearing outfits try and make it as an enjoyable experience as possible; make sure the costume doesn’t restrict movement, breathing or barking and remove the costume if they are showing sign of abnormal behavior or stress. Start trying on the costume days before Halloween, only having the costume on for 5-10 minutes at a time and praise them for cooperating with treats and lots of pets. Build the time up over a course of a week and your pet will be much more inclined to keep their costume on if they know it’s not a scary experience.

 

Jake-in-pumpkinTrick or treaters:

Some dogs are protective of their home and their family; making trick or treaters coming to the front door a stressful experience. If your pup isn’t comfortable with strangers regularly coming to the front door, have them rest in a crate or room away from the busy commotion. Add their favorite toy or treat (as long as they don’t need to be supervised while enjoying it) and put on some classical music or television to help them relax.

A great option for keeping their minds preoccupied would be a Kong filled with peanut butter or their favorite wet dog food.

 

Candy:

Don’t forget chocolate is poisonous to dogs so Halloween candy needs to be put out of reach. Chocolate contains components that humans can quickly breakdown but dogs break these components down much slower which can result in a built up to a toxic level. Although non-chocolate candy may not be poisonous to dogs, the high sugar content isn’t good for them to digest. Best to get your dog their own dog-friendly Halloween treat like pumpkin dog treats.

Pranksters:

With all the fun of Halloween comes the pranksters too; most of the pranks are harmless but keep an eye out for dangerous ones. Keep your dog (and all pets) inside the night of Halloween. For outdoor pets, bring them in a couple days prior to Halloween and a couple days following just to be safe. Check your yard the morning after Halloween for anything out of the ordinary that could be dangerous to your pet.

Decorations:bumblebee dog

Pumpkins and corn stalks are fun Halloween decorations but can be harmful for pets if ingested in large quantities leading to blockages. When decorating keep in mind of the height of your pet; tails can easily knock things over and paws can trip over electrical cords. Always keep open flames away from being knocked over, hide exposed electrical cords and monitor your pet closely when they are around decorations. <>/body>

It’s Pet Wellness Month, Let’s Talk Allergies & Dogs

Posted by: Pack Leader | October 11, 2015 | Posted in Dog Health

Bella Park 1It’s Pet Wellness Month! This month is focused on educating pet owners on the importance of annual wellness checks and preventing disease. Our pet’s health is important and we’re responsible for keeping them healthy all year long.  Unfortunately for our pets, allergies are not just limited to us. Our four-legged pups are susceptible to common allergies as well, so here are some of the most common allergies for dogs:

Environmental

Seasonal allergies: Just like human seasonal allergies, dogs are vulnerable to seasonal pollen allergies. These allergies usually present a bit differently in our four-legged friend than with us though.

Other allergens: This category is vague because almost anything can be an allergen; it can vary from your dog being allergic to specific plants, mold, dander, prescription drugs, dust mites, etc. There is such a wide variety of allergens that if your pet is experiencing allergy symptoms is it beneficial to discuss it with your veterinarian.

 

Food

Grain based

Protein

Food based allergies are very common in dogs but sometimes hard to pin down to exactly what ingredient is causing the allergy symptom. There are multiple low-ingredient dog food brands on the market that allow you to try different protein and grain sources. Testing different ingredients of dog food is a long process since results can take weeks or months to present themselves but it’s worth it in the long run for a healthy pup!

Insect Bites

Bee stings

Flea bites

Spider and other insect bites

These allergies can come out of the blue and you probably won’t know until your pup experiences bites or stings and see the allergic reaction. The severity of the allergic reaction can vary just like it does in humans from mild to severe.

Common Allergy Symptoms:

Increased itching

Sneezing

Increased licking

Inflammation/Swelling

Increased licking of paws/swollen paws

Itchy, watery eyes

Runny nose

Skin rashes (Red, itchy or scabed patches of skin)

Solutions?Dog Allergy Blog

Many mild allergies can be treated with some benadryl or hydrocortisone cream but severe allergies may require more intense treatments. Of course food or drug allergies once diagnosed can easily be fixed with avoiding the allergy causing ingredient in your dog’s diet. If your dog is presenting with symptoms of allergies, it is best to discuss this with your vet; treatments vary greatly depending on the severity of your dog’s allergies and the type of allergy.

We want to hear from you! Do you have a dog that has an allergy? How’d you narrow down your dog’s allergy? Do you have a non-traditional method for keeping your dog’s allergy under control?

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