Raise Your Paws! We’re Answering Your Nail Trimming Questions

Posted by: admin | September 26, 2015 | Posted in Uncategorized

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As dog owners we always want to keep our dog happy and healthy; one easy way to do this is regular nail trimming. Below we are going to answer some of the most common nail clipping questions we get asked!

My dog’s nails are really long, why can’t you just cut them really short?

dog nail anatomy graphic

This requires a bit of nail anatomy; dog’s nails have blood vessels that run down the length of the nail called the quick. The quick feeds the new nail growth with nutrients; as the nail grow out so does the blood vessels in order to continue to ‘feed’ the new nail. The length of the quick limits how short you can trim the nails but with regular nail trimming or dremels you can make the quick recede allowing you to get the dog’s nails shorter.

 

How often should I trim my dog’s nails?

The exact time varies on the dog so there isn’t a concrete answer. There are a lot of factors that affect nail growth: nutrition, exercise, health and age just to name a few. Some dogs needs nail trims every 2-3 weeks while some need them only every 5-6 weeks and some rarely need them. Easy way is to ballpark about 4 weeks and then adjust based on how short/long your dog’s nails are.

What’s the difference between getting a nail trim and a nail dremel?

First and foremost, the tools that are used are different. Nail trims use nail clippers while a nail dremel uses a handheld sander to file down the nail. As you can see from the diagrams, nail trims cut the nail up to the quick and you’re left with a flat cut. Nail dremels on the other hand allow you to sand the nail down without leaving a flat cut and get a bit closer to the quick while sanding out any rough edges.

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Which is better a nail trim or a nail dremel?

That’s really up to your dog, nail trimming is important for the health of your dog so either method your dog is comfortable with is going to be the better option. As a heads up, a lot of dogs who don’t get nail trims often are scared of the dremel and it takes some regular use to get them comfortable with it. If you’re unsure, talk to your groomer or pet grooming professional to see which is the best method for your dog.

Help! My dog won’t let me trim his nails, what should I do?

We see this a lot so you’re not alone; plenty of dogs will not let their owners trim their nails. This depends on how dedicated you are to wanting to trim your dog’s nails yourself. You can train your dog to sit patiently for nail trims using positive reinforcement training but it does take some time and you won’t be able to do all four paws let alone all eighteen (twenty if your dog has rear dew claws) nails at once. There are a plethora of dog grooming salons and dog daycares that offer grooming services that will be more than happy to do nail trims for you. Pricing for these are pretty reasonable and usually range from $10 to $20.

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We love answering your pawesome questions! Leave a comment down below if you have another nail care question or dog-related question.

Giardia & What you Should Know

Posted by: admin | September 19, 2015 | Posted in Dog Health

Jake with leavesFall has arrived! Unfortunately fall brings more than just Seahawks and PSL’s; there is also a higher risk of Giardia. Below is the quick & dirty facts every dog owner should know about giardia.

What is it?

Microscopic parasite that inhabits the intestines of their host for part of their lifecycle. It has a multi-form lifecycle including the cyst form & reproducing form.

The reproducing form stays in the intestine of their host, while the cyst form is shed through feces and goes on to infect new hosts.

What are the symptoms?

Diarrhea (sometimes bloody diarrhea), gas, vomiting, nausea, weight loss and abdominal discomfort.

It is possible to have giardia and be asymptomatic (showing no symptoms at all).

How did my dog get it?

Bad news here, it’s hard to figure out because the dog just has to ingest the giardia cysts. Giardia can survive long periods of time in certain conditions; here are the numbers the CDC gives us:

In soil:

Cold Temperatures (approx. 39.2°F) = 7 weeks

Room Temperatures (approx. 77°F) = 1 week

Dry, warm surfaces experiences direct sunlight= few days

Moist, cool environments = several weeks

In water:

Less than 50°F (lake water, winter-time puddle water) = 1-3 months

Greater than 50°F (fall-time river water, puddle in summer) = less than 1-3 months

Greater than 98.6°F = 4 days

Can I get it from my dog?

It is unlikely because there are multiple types of giardia and the type that infects dogs doesn’t infect humans. However, the type of Giardia that does infect humans can be transmitted to dogs which then can be transmitted back to humans.

How is it diagnosed?

Vets will test a fecal sample for the presence of giardia proteins using the ELISA test. This generally isn’t a standard test including in the annual fecal testing suggested by vets so if you are concerned ask your vet about it.

How is it treated?

Good news! It’s fairly easy to treat, the common treatment is a broad spectrum de-wormer and an antibiotic usually lasting 5-7 days. Sometimes there are multiple rounds of treatment needed in order to clear the giardia. There is no over the counter (OTC) medication available so a visit to the vet is required for treatment.

 

For further information check out the CDC website for reliable information: CDC Giardia

Bark to School

Posted by: admin | September 6, 2015 | Posted in Dog Boarding, Dog Daycare, Dog Health

Bark to School ChalkboardIn this edition of the Central Barker, we are gearing up for Bark to School! Kids head back to school in the next couple weeks which means the dogs that have been staying at home with the kids during the summer are now going to be home alone during the day. For some dogs this is great: more naptimes and less bribing the kids for extra treats; but for some pups this is just means more unsupervised time to cause mischief!

So parents when you’re buying all the school supplies for your kids, let’s also think about gearing our four-legged kids to get ready for their ‘bark’ to daycare!

If your pup has never gone to daycare, there’s a couple additional steps you should be aware of. Most daycares require some sort of behavioral evaluation or interview for new dogs before they can come in. Plan ahead of time for this and call ahead to set up an appointment as well as know the requirements the daycare has. These tend to book out 2-7 days ahead of time so keep that in mind when you’re planning.

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For both ‘freshmen’ and ‘senior’ daycare dog goers it’s important to make sure they are up-to-date on all vaccines, flea preventative and/or fecal tests. Call the daycare ahead of time to make sure they have all the records and if something is missing call your vet to get it taken care of. There’s nothing worse than dropping your pup off for the day and then learning they cannot play due to an expired vaccine.

Now you’re ready! Your pup rocking their new collar, ready to make some new friends or see some old ones. There might even be a teary goodbye the first day but you’ll be reassured when your pup is passed out on the car ride home that they had a blast at daycare!

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